Prospective Member

Are you thinking about joining the RCMP? As a member of the RCMP, you automatically become a member of the RCMP Pension Plan and are entitled to group insurance benefits. Knowing more about these plans will give you a better understanding of the compensation package offered to RCMP members.

Listed below are some common questions and answers that may be of interest to you as a prospective member of the RCMP.

Who can become a member of the RCMP Pension Plan?

As a member of the RCMP, you would be automatically enrolled in the RCMP Pension Plan.  Once enrolled, you would begin accumulating pensionable service which would count towards your pension benefit.

You are not engaged as a member of the RCMP until you graduate from Depot, the RCMP training facility. So, your time related to your RCMP training would not be considered pensionable service.

What is the difference between service in the Force and pensionable service?

While you are employed with the RCMP you earn both service in the Force and pensionable service.  The two together determine your benefit eligibility under the RCMP Pension Plan.

In general, service in the Force determines the type of benefit, such as an immediate annuity, while pensionable service determines the amount of the benefit. While a given period of service may or may not be considered pensionable service, all service with the RCMP is considered service in the Force.

Pensionable service with other plans transferred to the RCMP Pension Plan may also be considered as service in the Force, at the discretion of the RCMP.

What would your pension plan include?

The Pension Entitlement Information Package provides a summary of what the plan offers.

Who pays into the RCMP pension plan?

Both you and the RCMP would contribute a certain percentage each year.  These current service contributions may change annually and are determined by Treasury Board Secretariat.

How would your pension be calculated?

Your RCMP pension income would be calculated based on your years and days of pensionable service and your average annual salary for the five (5) consecutive years of highest paid service.

Your age and years of service in the Force would also be taken into consideration when calculating your pension. For more information see the Personalized Pension Tools - Pension Calculator section.

When you retire, your retirement income would generally come from three sources:

  • Your RCMP Pension Plan
  • Government pension plans, such as Old Age Security (OAS), the Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan (CPP or QPP)
  • Your personal savings

The Old Age Security benefit is payable to Canadian citizens who meet certain residency criteria. For details, refer to the Old Age Security (OAS) Program on the Service Canada Web site.

The Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan provides basic retirement income to Canadian workers.

How are contributions to the RCMP Pension Plan managed and where is the money invested?

The Public Sector Pension Investment Board (PSPIB) manages the contributions in a variety of investments. For more information, visit the Funding of the Pension Plan section of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Web site.

Would your family members be protected in the event of your death?

If you have two (2) or more years of pensionable service, your family would be protected under your pension plan in the event of your death.  As a member of the RCMP Pension Plan, your survivors and your eligible children may be entitled to survivor benefits and child allowances and may have coverage under the group insurance plans.

If you have less than two (2) years of pensionable service, your eligible survivors or estate would be entitled to a Return of Contributions plus interest.

What insurance or other benefits would be available to you?

The following plans may be available to you:

  • Basic Health Care: As of April 1, 2013, Regular Members of the RCMP are covered under their Provincial/Territorial Health Care Plans.

  • RCMP Supplemental Health Care Benefits provide Regular Members with coverage for supplementary health and dental services. In addition, eligible members may receive coverage for Occupational Health Care Benefits. Both types of benefits are available at no cost to eligible members with limitations as outlined in the RCMP Benefits Grid. Eligible members should use their Blue Cross Health Identification Card for all supplemental and occupational health care benefits. Regular Members should direct all questions or issues to their appropriate Occupational Health and Safety Services office. Contact information may be found on the internal RCMP InfoWeb.

  • For prospective members who live in provinces or territories where a contribution is required for provincial health care, Employer Contribution to Provincial Health Insurance will explain how your employer shares the contribution.

  • Public Service Dental Care Plan (PSDCP) provides Civilian Members, their dependents, and the dependents of Regular Members with coverage, up to certain limits, for dental service and supply expenses. Coverage under the PSDCP begins after 3 months of continuous employment.

  • Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) provides supplementary health care coverage for Civilian Members, their dependents, and the dependents of Regular Members.

  • RCMP Group Life, Accidental Death and Dismemberment and Disability insurance plans are offered to Regular Members and Civilian Members of the RCMP. The Group Life Insurance Plans are administered by Morneau Shepell on behalf of the RCMP. For more information on available insurances for RCMP Regular and Civilian Members, please refer to the Morneau Shepell website.

What insurance benefits would be available to you when you retire?

  • The Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) coverage is available upon retirement when you are entitled to receive an on-going pension benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan. You must apply for this coverage.

  • Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP) is an optional plan established by the Government to provide dental services coverage to eligible RCMP pensioners and their eligible dependents. It provides coverage for specific services and supplies that are not covered under a provincial health or dental care plan.

  • RCMP Group Life and Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance plan coverage may continue for retired RCMP members if you are eligible to receive a pension benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan. Detailed information may be found on the Morneau Shepell Web site.

After you retire, would your pension be protected from inflation?

Yes. Your pension would be protected from losing its value as a result of inflation or increases in the cost of living for the rest of your life. Your pension will be adjusted every January 1, based on increases in the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

Would previous federal public service employment count as pensionable service under the RCMP Pension Plan?

You may be able to buy back several types of prior service:

  • Service with the federal public service
  • Service with the Canadian Forces
  • Prior RCMP service

Prior RCMP service would count as service in the Force, if purchased. Most service with the Canadian Forces and with the federal public service does not count as service in the Force.

Would employment outside the federal public service count as pensionable service under the RCMP Pension Plan?

If you were a member of a pension plan with your former employer, there are ways of increasing your pension under the RCMP Pension Plan.

You have two options:

  1. Buy back eligible prior service.
  2. Transfer pensionable service from your former pension plan to the RCMP Pension Plan. This can be done through a pensionable employment "plan to plan" transfer or through a Pension Transfer Agreement, if one exists between your former employer and the RCMP. If not, the RCMP Pension Transfer Agreement Unit and your former employer may be able to negotiate one.

There is a time limit for exercising the PTA option if a PTA is in place. While a pensionable employment buyback or transfer can be done at any time while you are an active member of the RCMP Pension Plan, costs increase with time.

If your employment outside the federal public service was service as a police officer, it may count as service in the Force if all the requirements are met. See service in the Force for more information.