Retired Member

This site is organized around common life events that may apply to you as a retired member of the RCMP. By selecting one of the life events you'll find information on your potential entitlements.

To find out the meaning of a term used in this section, please consult the Glossary.

Life events

Newly Retired

The following questions and answers will provide an understanding of your pension entitlements and availability of insurance coverage as a retired member of the RCMP Pension Plan.

What are your pension benefit options as a retired member of the RCMP?

Your benefit options vary depending on your years of service in the Force, pensionable service, and your age when you leave the RCMP. If you have at least two years of service in the Force, you may be entitled to one or more of the following options:

If you have less than two years of service in the Force, generally you are entitled to some combination of:

You may also be eligible to transfer all or part of your accrued pension credits to the Public Service Pension Plan, the Canadian Forces Pension Plan, or to another pension plan through a Pension Transfer Agreement. A transfer is not dependent on the number of years of pensionable service you have to your credit.

For additional information, please see the Preparing for Retirement life event in the Active Member section of this website.

How do you choose a benefit option if you've not already done so?

To choose your option, you must complete retirement documents and forward them to the Government of Canada Pension Centre. You can acquire the documents through the Pension Centre if you haven't already done so.

Please note that you must choose your benefit option within one year from the day you leave the RCMP. Failure to do so means you're considered to have chosen a Deferred Annuity. If you're a Civilian Member, you may choose at a later date to receive an Annual Allowance. Regular Members do not have this option.

Is your pension benefit deposited directly into your bank account?

As part of the Government of Canada's efforts to reduce paper consumption, the Pension Centre issues all payments by direct deposit. If you haven't already signed up for direct deposit, we encourage you to do so as soon as possible. Send a written request, along with a void cheque, to the Pension Centre. Please include your pension number on both documents.

If you live outside Canada, consult the Foreign Direct Deposit site to find a list of participating countries.

What is the formula for calculating your pension benefit?

The basic pension formula is calculated as follows:

  • 2%
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    (for your best 5 consecutive
    years of service)

The RCMP Pension Plan benefit consists of two parts: a lifetime pension benefit and a bridge benefit.

A lifetime pension benefit is the permanent portion of the pension payable from the date the pension begins until death.

A bridge benefit is a temporary amount payable from the date the pension begins until age 65. The bridge benefit is roughly the same amount the member will receive under the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan (CPP or QPP) at age 65.

If you become entitled to CPP disability benefits, the bridge benefit ends immediately.

The formula for calculating the lifetime pension amount is:

Lifetime pension

When you retire, you'll receive a lifetime pension based on the average annual salary of your five consecutive years of highest paid service and your years of pensionable service, as follows:

  • 1.375% Footnote 1
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    up to the AMPE

Plus

  • 2%
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    in excess of the AMPE

If your pension includes part-time service, the benefits are adjusted to reflect the part-time assigned hours of work compared to the full-time hours of the position.

  • Each period of full- or part-time service must be calculated individually then totalled
  • Your years of pensionable service include any service you have bought back, whether or not fully paid for
  • Your highest average annual salary is calculated for your five consecutive years of highest paid service, including any salary earned after completing 35 years of service and where, for periods of part-time service, it is based on an equivalent full-time salary
  • If you are in receipt of an annual allowance, the unreduced annual pension amount is reduced by a factor based on your circumstances at discharge
  • This benefit amount is coordinated with the benefit you'll receive from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), and includes a "bridge benefit" paid until you begin receiving CPP (usually at age 65)

Bridge benefit

If you retire before age 65, you'll receive a bridge benefit in addition to the lifetime pension benefit. This temporary benefit helps to "bridge" your pension until age 65, when CPP or QPP begins or until you become entitled to CPP or QPP disability benefits, whichever comes first. The bridge benefit is calculated as follows:

  • 0.625% Footnote 2
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    up to the AMPE

Total Pension

Your total pension (lifetime pension + bridge benefit) will be equal to 2% of your average salary.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Return to footnote 1 referrer

This percentage applies if you will reach age 65 in 2012 or later (i.e. you were born in 1947 or later). The percentages if you were born before 1947 are indicated below:

  • Before 1943: 1.3%
  • 1943: 1.315%
  • 1944: 1.330%
  • 1945: 1.345%
  • 1946: 1.360%
Footnote 2

Return to footnote 2 referrer

This bridge benefit factor applies if you will reach age 65 in 2012 or later (i.e. you were born in 1947 or later). If you were born before 1947, the applicable factor is indicated below:

  • Before 1943: 0.700%
  • 1943: 0.685%
  • 1944: 0.670%
  • 1945: 0.655%
  • 1946: 0.640%

When can you expect to receive your first pension payment?

With the required documentation in hand, the Pension Centre normally issues your first pension payment within 45 calendar days from the date of retirement.

When is your monthly pension benefit paid?

Your monthly pension benefit is deposited into your bank account on the third last banking day of each month.

Where can you find information about the deductions taken from your pension payment?

You can find information about the deductions that are or can be taken from your pension payment in the Pension Entitlement Information Package.

What is a "bridge benefit"? Why does it stop at age 65?

If you retire before age 65, you'll receive a bridge benefit in addition to your RCMP pension benefit. This temporary payment helps to “bridge” your pension until CPP begins at age 65. The bridge benefit will end before age 65 if you begin to receive CPP or QPP disability benefits.

Is your pension benefit protected from inflation?

Yes. Your pension is protected forever from losing its value as a result of inflation or increases in the cost of living. Your pension will be adjusted every January 1st, based on increases in the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

However, if you're re-employed by the RCMP and begin contributing to the RCMP Pension Plan, your monthly pension (including indexing) will end. This is because you cannot receive a pension and accumulate pensionable service under the RCMP Pension Plan at the same time.

For more information on the effects of re-employment, refer to the Re-employment After Retirement life event.

What happens if you retire and haven't finished paying for a period of prior service?

If you retire before paying all your installments for prior service, your pension will include all your service buyback, but the unpaid installments will be deducted from your monthly pension benefit amount.

What happens if you retire but haven't finished paying your pension contributions or benefit premiums for a period of leave without pay?

When you retire, amounts still owing for a period of leave without pay will continue to be deducted from your monthly pension benefit. Information on payment options can be found in the Current Service Buyback section of the Pension Entitlement Information Package.

Similarly, you must pay any insurance benefit premiums or contributions still owing for a period of leave without pay. For further information, please contact RCMP National Pay Operations at 1-866-729-7293.

Does your health care coverage continue now that you're retired?

Your supplemental health care provided by the RCMP ends at retirement. If you are eligible to receive a RCMP pension benefit, you may apply for pensioner supplemental health care under the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) for yourself and your eligible dependents.

Does your dental coverage continue?

You and your dependent's dental coverage ends when you retire. However, as a retired RCMP member who is eligible to receive a pension benefit, you can apply for pensioner dental coverage for yourself and your eligible dependents. The Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP) provides coverage for specific services and supplies that are not covered under a provincial health or dental care plan.

Does your Disability Insurance Plan coverage continue?

Your coverage under the RCMP Disability Insurance Plan ends at retirement. Benefits under the plan are payable only after you have discharged from the RCMP. Claims submitted prior to discharge will be assessed and, if the definition of disability under the plan is met, benefits may be approved pending discharge. Claims may be submitted up to six (6) months following your date of discharge.

Reaching Age 65

The RCMP Pension Plan is coordinated with the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP). "Coordination" means that the RCMP Pension Plan takes into account the contributions and benefits that a plan member will pay into, and receive from, the CPP or QPP. As a result, the RCMP Pension Plan provides for the payment of a lifetime pension payable until your death as well as a temporary bridge benefit payable until age 65.

The following questions and answers will help you understand your lifetime pension and bridge benefit and the coordination of the RCMP Pension Plan with the CPP or QPP.

Why are the RCMP Pension Plan contribution rates coordinated with the CPP and QPP?

The RCMP Pension Plan is coordinated with the Canada Pension Plan/Quebec Pension Plan Coordination so that employees don't have to set aside a greater proportion of their salary for retirement savings.

Your RCMP pension benefits include a lifetime pension and a temporary bridge benefit which is payable until the first of the month following your 65th birthday. If you receive disability benefits before age 65, the bridge benefit stops immediately.

If you're still working at age 65, the bridge benefit will not be paid upon retirement. Please see Retirement Income Sources for more information.

When will your bridge benefit end?

If you retire before age 65, you will receive a bridge benefit payable until age 65.

However, if you begin receiving a CPP or QPP disability pension before age 65, your bridge benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan will stop immediately. It's your responsibility to inform the Government of Canada Pension Centre if you start to receive a disability pension under the CPP or QPP. Failure to do so means having to pay back any overpayments.

Does your bridge benefit cease before age 65 if you choose to receive your CPP or QPP benefit either before or after that age?

The bridge benefit will continue to be paid until age 65 even if you choose to receive an early or late CPP or QPP retirement benefit.

However, if you choose to receive your CPP/QPP benefits early, your CPP/QPP benefit will be reduced for life and you'll receive a reduced CPP/QPP amount after age 65. As a result, you can expect to see a decrease in your total pension income when your bridge benefit ends at age 65 because you chose an early (reduced) CPP/QPP benefit.

The bridge benefit will stop on the first of the month following your 65th birthday or on the date that you become entitled to a CPP or QPP disability pension.

What is the formula for calculating your lifetime pension and bridge benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan?

The basic pension formula is calculated as follows:

  • 2%
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    (for your best 5 consecutive
    years of service)

The RCMP Pension Plan benefit consists of two parts: a lifetime pension benefit and a bridge benefit.

A lifetime pension benefit is the permanent portion of the pension payable from the date the pension begins until death.

A bridge benefit is a temporary amount payable from the date the pension begins until age 65. The bridge benefit is roughly the same amount the member will receive under the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan (CPP or QPP) at age 65. Typically, at age 65, the bridge benefit ends.

Lifetime pension

When you retire, you'll receive a lifetime pension based on the average annual salary of your five consecutive years of highest paid service and your years of pensionable service.

The basic formula for the unreduced annual pension amount payable from the RCMP Pension Plan is:

  • 1.375% Footnote 3
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    up to the AMPE

Plus

  • 2%
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    in excess of the AMPE
  • Each period of full- or part-time service must be calculated individually then totalled
  • Your years of pensionable service include any service you have bought back, whether or not fully paid for
  • Your highest average annual salary is calculated for your five consecutive years of highest paid service, including any salary earned after completing 35 years of service. For periods of part-time service, it's based on an equivalent full-time salary
  • If you are in receipt of an annual allowance, the unreduced annual pension amount is reduced by a factor based on your circumstances at discharge
  • This benefit amount is coordinated with the benefit you'll receive from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), and includes a "bridge benefit" paid until you begin receiving CPP (usually at age 65)

Bridge benefit

If you retire before age 65, you'll receive a bridge benefit in addition to the lifetime pension benefit. This temporary benefit helps to "bridge" your pension until age 65, when CPP or QPP begins or until you become entitled to CPP or QPP disability benefits, whichever occurs first. The bridge benefit is calculated as follows:

  • 0.625% Footnote 4
  • ×
  • Years of Pensionable Service
    (maximum 35 years)
  • ×
  • Your Highest Average Salary
    up to the AMPE

Total Pension

Your total pension (lifetime pension + bridge benefit) will be equal to 2% of your average salary.

Footnotes 2

Footnote 3

Return to footnote 3 referrer

This percentage applies if you will reach age 65 in 2012 or later (i.e. you were born in 1947 or later). The percentages if you were born before 1947 are indicated below:

  • Before 1943: 1.3%
  • 1943: 1.315%
  • 1944: 1.330%
  • 1945: 1.345%
  • 1946: 1.360%
Footnote 4

Return to footnote 4 referrer

This bridge benefit factor applies if you will reach age 65 in 2012 or later (i.e. you were born in 1947 or later). If you were born before 1947, the applicable factor is indicated below:

  • Before 1943: 0.700%
  • 1943: 0.685%
  • 1944: 0.670%
  • 1945: 0.655%
  • 1946: 0.640%

Is the indexing payable on your pension affected when the bridge benefit ceases at age 65?

If you retire before age 65, the indexation amount on your RCMP pension is calculated based on the total amount of the benefit you receive (i.e. lifetime pension + bridge benefit). When your bridge benefit ends, the indexing amount is reduced because it's based only on the lifetime pension amount.

At age 65, when the bridge benefit normally ends, is there any effect on the pension benefit payable to your survivors?

Survivor benefits are normally equal to half of your lifetime pension and bridge benefit. The survivor benefits are calculated at this rate even after the bridge benefit ceases which is normally at age 65. Your survivor can receive survivor benefits under the CPP or QPP and also receive a full survivor benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan.

What happens to coverage under the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec (RAMQ) when Quebec residents turn 65?

When Quebec residents reach the age of 65 they're automatically covered under the drug insurance plan of the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec (RAMQ). In addition, an RCMP member can choose to be covered by both RAMQ and the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP).

For further information on coverage under the RAMQ plan, or to find out how to cancel your enrolment, please visit the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec (RAMQ) website.

Re-employment After Retirement

The following questions and answers will help you understand the impact that re-employment may have on your pension.

What happens if you become re-employed in the RCMP after you retire?

Your monthly pension will end because you cannot receive a benefit from the RCMP Pension Plan and contribute to the plan at the same time.

Your monthly pension will be reactivated when you stop contributing to the plan. At that time, your monthly pension will be recalculated based on your total pension credits including those earned during your re-employment period. The indexation amount payable will be based on your most recent date of retirement.

What happens if you're re-employed in the RCMP after you've already received a Transfer Value?

If you're re-employed in the RCMP, and are contributing to the RCMP Pension Plan, you can elect to purchase the pensionable service for which you received a Transfer Value benefit. Additional information can be obtained by contacting the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

Getting Married or Reaching Common-Law Status

Your new spouse or common-law partner may be eligible for coverage under your pension and group insurance plans. The following questions and answers provide further details.

You were married or lived in a common-law relationship prior to your 60th birthday. Will your spouse or common-law partner be entitled to a survivor benefit upon your death?

Your spouse will normally be entitled to a survivor benefit if you were married before your 60th birthday or, if over age 60, you were an active member at the time of your marriage.

If you lived in a common-law relationship before your 60th birthday or, if over age 60 still an active member, and for at least one year before your death, your common-law partner may be entitled to a survivor benefit. You can provide information about your common-law relationship by completing the Statutory Declaration and forwarding it to the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

You married after age 60. Will your new spouse be entitled to a survivor benefit upon your death?

If you marry on or after your 60th birthday and are retired at the time of your marriage, your surviving spouse is not normally entitled to a pension. However, you may elect to provide your legally married spouse with a benefit by taking a reduction in your own pension. This is called Optional Survivor Benefit (OSB). You must choose this option within one year of marriage. Contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre for more information.

If you're receiving a survivor benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan, does that benefit end if you remarry?

No. A survivor pension is payable for life and is not affected by remarriage.

Is your new spouse or common-law partner covered under your insurance benefits plans?

Your new spouse or common-law partner may be covered under your insurance plans. If you have opted for coverage under the Public Service Health Care Plan or the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan as a retired member, you can also apply for coverage for your new spouse or eligible common-law partner and/or dependent children.

  • Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) coverage is available upon retirement if you're entitled to an on-going pension benefit under the RCMP Pension Plan. You must apply for this coverage.
  • Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP) is an optional plan established by the Government of Canada to provide coverage to eligible RCMP pensioners and their eligible dependents. It provides coverage for specific services and supplies that aren't covered under a provincial health or dental care plan.
  • You may wish to review and update your RCMP Group Life Insurance beneficiary information. Depending upon the age of your new spouse or common–law partner, he/she may be able to apply for Dependent Life Insurance, as well. For detailed information, visit the Morneau Shepell website.

Becoming Disabled After Retirement

The following questions and answers will provide you with an understanding of the impact on your pension benefits if you become disabled after retirement. For more information please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

If you become disabled after retirement and before age 60, what happens to your benefit?

If you become disabled after retirement and before age 60, you may be entitled to additional benefits. Please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre for assistance.

What effect does becoming disabled have on your pension benefit?

If you're currently receiving an RCMP pension benefit as either an immediate annuity or annual allowance, there's no effect on your pension benefit. Regular and Civilian Members under 60 years of age who have become disabled since retirement are subject to annual cost of living increases (indexation). If you had discharged with a deferred annuity payable at age 60 and become disabled prior to reaching that age, the deferred annuity is replaced by an immediate annuity (unreduced pension), payable immediately. This unreduced pension is equal to the indexed value of the deferred annuity. For more information, please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

What happens if you return to health?

If you're receiving an RCMP pension benefit as a result of becoming disabled and you subsequently regain your health before age 60, then the immediate annuity is replaced by:

  • If you're less than 50 years of age, a deferred annuity payable at age 60 or transfer value
  • If you're 50 years of age or older, a deferred annuity payable at age 60 or annual allowance

For more information, please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

Divorce or Separation

The following questions and answers will help you understand the possible impact on your pension and insurance benefit plans in the event that your marriage or common-law relationship breaks down.

Who should you inform in the event of your divorce or separation?

You should inform the Government of Canada Pension Centre by sending copies of the relevant documents:

  • The divorce decree absolute or
  • If you're no longer in a common-law relationship – a letter advising the Government of Canada Pension Centre that the relationship has ended

Please include your pension number on all documents.

Can your pension benefits be divided in the event of divorce or separation?

Yes. The Pension Benefits Division Act provides for the division of the pension benefits that you've accumulated under the RCMP Pension Plan in the event of a marriage or common-law relationship breakdown.

Who is eligible for a division of pension benefits?

You or your common-law partner/common-law partner may apply after you've been separated for at least one year. However, if the application is based on a Court Order pertaining to divorce, annulment or separation, then the one-year separation requirement doesn't apply.

In the case of a common-law relationship, you may apply for a division of pension benefits only if your relationship lasted a minimum of one year.

In either case, you must have a Court Order or a written agreement signed by you and your spouse that provides for the division of pension benefits.

What steps are involved in obtaining a division of pension benefits?

Either you or your former spouse/common-law partner may apply for a pension benefits division.

  • Step 1: Request information.

    Contact the Pension Centre to request an estimate and to confirm which documents or forms are required. If you want an estimate of the division amount before applying, you must submit the Request for Pension Benefits Division Information form, along with any other required documents.

  • Step 2: Submit application.

    You must submit the Application for Division of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act Pension form, along with your Court Order or written agreement, and any other required documents.

  • Step 3: Division of pension benefits.

    When the division has been approved, the amount representing the value of the benefits earned during the period subject to division is transferred into a chosen registered retirement savings account(s).

These steps are described in more detail in the Division of Pension Benefits Package. Additional information can be found under the Pension Benefits Division Act and the Pension Benefits Division Regulations.

How does a pension division affect your pension?

If you're receiving a pension, it'll be reduced immediately once the division is approved.

How are your survivor benefits affected?

If you were divorced at the time of your death, your former spouse would not be entitled to a survivor benefit.

If you were separated from your common-law partner at the time of your death, that partner's entitlement to a survivor benefit ends immediately upon separation and he/she would not be entitled to a survivor benefit.

If you were separated from your legal spouse, but not divorced at the time of your death, your spouse would be entitled to survivor benefits.

If you were separated from your legal spouse, and he/she had applied for a division of pension benefits, then your former spouse would only be entitled to a survivor benefit for the portion not covered by the division.

Should you inform the Government of Canada Pension Centre if the person you've named as the beneficiary moves?

Yes. In the event of your death, if the Government of Canada Pension Centre has a current address for your beneficiary, the benefit can be paid more quickly.

When you contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre, please have the following available:

  • Pension number
  • Name of beneficiary
  • Your beneficiary's new address

How are your insurance benefit plans affected?

Once divorced, your former spouse is no longer eligible for benefits under both the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP).

If there’s a change in your relationship status—such as a divorce or separation from a spouse or common-law partner—you may wish to change your PSHCP and PDSP coverage from "Family" to "Single" if there are no other dependents.

Please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre to amend your PSHCP and PDSP coverage. For PSHCP and PDSP, you must also update your positive enrolment information with Sun Life. Changes can be made by visiting the Sun Life website.

You may also wish to review and update your beneficiary information for your RCMP Group Life and Accidental Death and Dismemberment plans. For more information, please contact the RCMP Insurance Administrator, Morneau Shepell, at 1-800-661-7595 or visit their website.

Living Outside Canada

The following information is intended for retired members who live outside of the country.

If you move outside of Canada, please advise the Government of Canada Pension Centre of your new address. The Pension Centre can then advise if your move will affect survivor benefits, your insurance benefits plan coverage or your income tax.

Please see the following questions and answers for more information.

Can you receive your pension payment at an address outside of Canada?

Yes. Payments are made in the currency of your country of residence. However, if you choose to have your pension payment by direct deposit to a bank in Canada, it will be issued in Canadian dollars.

Can the direct deposit of your pension payment be sent to a bank outside of Canada?

Yes. If you live in one of the countries accepting foreign direct deposits, your pension payment can be deposited directly into your account. The deposit is made in the currency of the country in which you live.

Visit the Foreign Direct Deposit site to review the countries that offer direct deposit and/or to obtain the required direct deposit enrolment forms.

How is your pension income reported for income tax purposes now that you live outside the country?

As a non-resident, you will receive an NR4 slip indicating your pension payment income.

If part of your pension payment income is paid under the terms of the Retirement Compensation Arrangements (RCA), you'll also receive an NR4-RCA slip.

However, the total amount of income tax withheld from all pension benefits under the RCMP Pension Plan and the RCA will be reported only on the NR4 slip.

For the year that you move outside Canada, you'll receive both a T4A and an NR4 slip.

How is the amount deducted for income tax determined now that you are living outside Canada?

The amount deducted for income tax is determined by your country of residence according to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) non-resident tax guidelines.

Can you get a tax exemption or reduction in the amount of non-resident tax that's withheld from your pension?

The Government of Canada Pension Centre is required to withhold tax according to your country of residence. Any exemption or reduction in the amount of tax to be withheld must be authorized in writing by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Please contact the International Tax Services Office if you wish to pursue an exemption or reduction.

Does your Public Service Health Care Plan coverage continue?

Your Public Service Health Care Plan coverage can continue, however, the cost of coverage for those living abroad is higher than it is for Canadian residents. For information concerning rates and coverage, please consult the Public Service Health Care Plan Directive. Claims will be paid in the currency of the country where you reside. You will need to apply to change to out-of-country coverage.

Does your Pensioners' Dental Services Plan coverage continue?

You're covered by the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan as long as you continue to pay your contributions. Reimbursement is based on reasonable dental charges in the area where the services are performed. Eligible expenses are reimbursed in Canadian dollars.

When Death Occurs

In the event of your death, your survivor or legal representative should immediately notify the Government of Canada Pension Centre. The following questions and answers will provide you with additional information about potential survivor and child entitlements under the RCMP Pension Plan.

Are your family members protected in the event of your death?

Your pension plan offers several types of protection for your family. For instance, your eligible survivors and eligible children may be entitled to survivor benefits and child allowances. For additional information contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre.

Who is able to claim survivor benefits?

Survivor benefits are payable to a surviving spouse and/or common-law partner. Please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre for more information.

What documentation is required to make a claim for survivor benefits?

A copy of the marriage certificate is required to support a claim by the legal spouse. For a common-law (same or opposite sex) partner, the application must include sworn statements and other evidence that demonstrates the conjugal nature and the period of the relationship. Please contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre for more information.

Are there children's allowances payable?

To be eligible for benefits under the RCMP Pension Plan, your child must normally be under 18 years of age. However, children between 18 and 25 may receive allowances if they're enrolled full-time in school or another educational institution and have attended continuously since their 18th birthday or the date of your death, whichever occurred later.

A child's allowance is equal to one-fifth of the survivor benefit to a maximum combined amount of four-fifths for all dependent children. If there are more than four children, the maximum combined amount payable may be divided among all the eligible children.

What is payable to the children if there is no survivor benefit?

When there is no survivor benefit payable to a spouse or common-law partner, the child's allowance is equal to twice the standard amount or two-fifths of the survivor benefit.

If there are no eligible survivors, are there any benefits payable?

Yes. Under the RCMP Pension Plan, there's a minimum benefit guarantee that's paid to the eligible survivors or to the estate of the deceased. For more information, refer to minimum benefit.

Should you inform the Government of Canada Pension Centre if the person you've named as your beneficiary moves?

Yes. In the event of your death, if the Government of Canada Pension Centre has a current address for your beneficiary, the benefit can be paid more quickly.

When you contact the Government of Canada Pension Centre, please have the following information available:

  • Pension number
  • Name of beneficiary
  • Your beneficiary's new address

Are your survivors covered under any group benefit plans in the event of your death?

Your survivors may be eligible to enroll for coverage under the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP) in the event of your death.

Do any of your group benefit plans continue for your family?

Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) coverage doesn't automatically continue for a survivor. An individual who's receiving a survivor or children's pension benefit must apply and be approved for PSHCP coverage to receive health benefits. Plan and enrolment information can be found on the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) website.

An application must also be made for dental coverage under the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP), in order to obtain this benefit. Plan and enrolment information can be found on the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan (PDSP) website.

What benefits are available if your death can be attributed to your service with the RCMP?

If your death is a result of your service with the RCMP, your spouse or eligible children may be entitled to benefits under the Pension Act and the Survivor Income Plan (SIP).

The Pension Act is administered by Veterans Affairs Canada and provides a tax-free benefit to the spouse and children of RCMP members in the case of a duty-related death. Your survivors should contact Veterans Affairs Canada to find out if they qualify for a benefit under the Pension Act.

A favourable decision under the Pension Act also qualifies your survivors for the Survivor Income Plan (SIP). This program provides an income top-up to the spouse and children of RCMP members in the case of a duty-related death.

Further information can be obtained through Veterans Affairs Canada.